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Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project

Internet Presentation

Version 060609

 

CAMP GRANT

 

By Janice Cottrell, APCRP Historian

 

As hostilities with the Apaches increased, Camp Grant was established in 1856 at the junction of the San Pedro River and Aravaipa Creek, originally called Camp Aravaipa.

 

Camp Grant c. 1869

Photo Courtesy: Arizona Historical Society – Tucson, AZ

 

In 1871, the Apache agreed to stop hostilities and settle near the camp. Later that year, the Camp Grant massacre took place; enraged by continuing raids, a party of Tucson American vigilante group citizens banded together with Tohono O'odham Indians. They attacked and killed Apaches in their camp just outside Camp Grant on April 23. All but 8 of the 144 dead were women and children.

 

 

Measurement Conversion Scale: “1 inch to ten chains” = 1 inch is 660 feet

 Camp Grant Courtesy: Andy Brunson

Camp Grant Cemetery in red box.

Measurement Conversion: 1 Chain = 66 Feet

 

 

Map by: Neal Du Shane

Indicates possible general vicinity of Camp Grant Cemetery

(has not been physically documented by APCRP)

 

They were ravished, wounded, and clubbed to death, hacked to pieces or brained by rocks. It was one of the most sadistic slaughters ever seen on the frontier. All the dead were buried around the camp.

 

Courtesy: Andy Brunson

 

Camp Grant was located on the east side of the San Pedro River, north of where the Aravaipa Creek meets the San Pedro River, between Mammouth and Winkelman, AZ.

 

Camp Grant was moved in 1872 to the south side of Mount Graham due to an increase in malarial infections in the troops. Soon after, 1,500 Aravaipa and Pinal Apaches were moved to San Carlos.

 

Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project

Internet Presentation

Version 060609

 

WebMaster: Neal Du Shane

 

n.j.dushane@comcast.net

 

Copyright © 2009 Neal Du Shane
All rights reserved. Information contained within this website may be used
for personal family history purposes, but not for financial profit or financial gain.
All contents of this website are willed to the Arizona Pioneer & Cemetery Research Project (
APCRP).

 

 

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